Weekly Updates: Clemson Extension Agents Provide Discuss Various Crops

Clint Thompson South Carolina, Top Posts

Clemson Extension agents provide updates in the The South Carolina Grower this week about the status of various crops being produced throughout the state.

Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “As we begin to see strawberry plants delivered into the area, don’t forget to examine the plants for pests and disease closely. With regards to disease, check the leaves for foliar disease and the roots for discoloration. A root dip fungicide application is very practical for managing crown rots.  Also, don’t forget your deer fences.”

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “We had beautiful sunny weather last week that really helped dry things out. Strawberry transplants are due in this week, and growers will start getting them in the ground as soon as they can. We have heard some reports of anthracnose coming from nurseries, so be sure to closely examine your plants and do not plant any that look weak. Since we are planting a little late, proper planting is all the more important. Be sure crews are planting transplants at the proper depth. Supervise them closely. Using row covers to push growing degree days may also be helpful this fall since most folks are planting a week or more late. There is a good article in this month’s NC Strawberry Association newsletter (pages 6-8) about using row covers in the fall.”

Supervise planting crews carefully to make sure plants are going into the ground at the proper depth. The crown should be just above the soil line. The plant pictured here is planted too deep and the crown is not visible. As a result, this plant is always going to be behind. Photo from Justin Ballew.

Phillip Carnley reports, “Nothing much has changed in Orangeburg or Calhoun counties. Like most of the state, shipments of strawberry plugs and crowns have been delayed upon arrival. Make sure to inspect plants with care to ensure that they are healthy. Brassica crops are loving the cooler night temperatures we’ve gotten recently, and I have noticed higher armyworm and looper pressure. With theses caterpillar pests, make sure you have a targeted spray program and rotate MOA’s. Try to not use the same MOA with in a 30-day timespan.”

Looper. Photo from Phillip Carnley.
Armyworm. Photo from Phillip Carnley.

Upstate

Kerrie Roach reports, “The temperatures have taken a significant turn with mornings in the 30s and 40s. Like many other areas, strawberry plugs seem to be running well behind schedule, which in our area has made for some tough decisions. Planting in the upstate (Oconee/Pickens/Anderson) should typically be done around the end of September, give or take 1-to-2 weeks. With the cool weather that has quickly moved in and plugs still not here (many not expected until the end of October), some growers have decided against planting for the 2022 season.”