Fungicide Sprays Vary for Various Pecan Varieties

Clint Thompson Georgia, Pecan, Top Posts

By Clint Thompson It’s that time of year when Georgia pecan producers need to start protecting their trees against fungal diseases, including scab. According to the University of Georgia Extension pecan blog, sprays vary among the different cultivars and their specific level of resistance. Low Input Cultivars Those that are considered low input cultivars include Avalon, Elliot, Excel, Kanza, Lakota …

Breaking Ground: Pecan Trials Planted at UGA’s VOVRC

Clint Thompson Georgia, Pecan, Top Posts

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is conducting pecan research at the UGA Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center (VOVRC) in Toombs County. Pecan trees were planted earlier this year and will be the basis for long-term research plots and short-term demonstration plots. Research will focus on low-input pecan varieties that can successfully grow in Georgia without incidence of pecan scab. …

Scab Disease: To Spray or Not to Spray?

Clint Thompson Alabama, Georgia, Pecan, Top Posts

The calendar may say it’s time for pecan producers to spray for scab but the weather conditions, combined with the current market season, say otherwise. Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist, says it still early to start spraying for scab disease this week. Next week should present a more optimal timeframe. It would also coincide with growers’ …

Georgia is Nuts About Pecans

Clint Thompson Georgia, Pecan, Top Posts

Brian Kemp is nuts about pecans. So is the rest of Georgia for that matter. Just call Georgia the “Pecan State.” Georgia’s Governor designated the pecan as Georgia’s official state nut on Friday at an event at Ellis Brothers Pecans in Vienna. According to the USDA Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, Georgia reclaimed the status as the largest pecan producer …

Breaking Ground: Pecan Trees More Effective in Planted Early

Clint Thompson Alabama, Georgia, Pecan, Top Posts

Pecan planting season has come and gone for most producers. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells believes farmers who planted their trees in early February are more likely to succeed compared to producers who planted their trees later, or in mid-March. Data from 2020 research supports his belief. “It confirmed what I had been seeing. Those that …