Georgia Blueberry Growers Face Disease Issue

Abigail Taylor Berries, Top Posts

The Georgia blueberry industry is currently learning to manage a disease that has become a larger problem to growers over the past few years. Harald Scherm, head of the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Georgia, says Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, caused by the yeast-like fungal plant pathogen Exobasidium maculosum, has recently…

UF/IFAS to Help Replant 100,000 Blueberry Bushes Downed by Hurricane Irma

Abigail Taylor Berries, Industry News Release, Weather

Hurricane Irma downed approximately 100,000 blueberry bushes at Frogmore Fresh Farm, a 125-acre blueberry farm in Pasco County. If these plants are not re-staked and reestablished, they will die, a significant loss for the grower and the Florida blueberry industry. Searching for a solution, Whitney Elmore, UF/IFAS Extension Pasco County director, worked through the UF/IFAS…

Hurricanes May Bring Unusual Pests

Abigail Taylor Pests, Top Posts, Weather

Hurricane Irma rolled through the Southeast and impacted many sectors of the region’s agriculture. While growers continue to assess the damage on their farms, Ayanava Majumdar, Extension entomologist for the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, reminds them to check their crop for unusual pests as well. According to Majumdar, insects generally do not like wet weather.…

South Florida Fruit and Vegetable Grower Damage Report

Abigail Taylor Labor, Top Posts, Weather

Hurricane Irma tore through Florida on September 10–11. Now, growers are assessing the damage on their farms and looking toward the future. Lisa Lochridge, director of public affairs for the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association (FFVA), says based on reports from growers, fruit and vegetable farms faced minimal damage. Before the hurricane came through, Calvin…

Hedged Pecan Trees Bring Unexpected Benefits

Abigail Taylor Pecan, Top Posts

Some larger-scale pecan growers in Georgia have been practicing hedging. Hedging is a practice in which the grower makes severe cuts to the tree to make it a little bit smaller than what it would normally be, which allows more sunlight to enter the orchard. Lenny Wells, an associate professor of horticulture and pecan specialist…

USDA Recovery Efforts for Hurricane Irma

Abigail Taylor Food Safety, Industry News Release, Top Posts, Weather

Contact: USDA Press, Phone: (202) 720-4623, Email: press@oc.usda.gov USDA Reminds Individuals and Small Businesses USDA Offers Disaster Assistance Programs to Help WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reminds rural communities, farmers and ranchers, families and small businesses impacted Hurricane Irma that USDA has programs that provide assistance in the wake of disasters. USDA staff…

Hurricane Irma Affects Southeast Agriculture

Abigail Taylor Top Posts, Weather

While Hurricane Irma released its fury on agricultural areas throughout the peninsula of Florida, it continues to work its way through Georgia and parts of Alabama with strong tropical force winds and rain today. Needless to say, agriculture, no matter what the crop, has been and will be affected. Here is U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny…

TREC Helps Growers, Trains Future Plant Breeders

Jaci Schreckengost Top Posts, Watermelon

Researchers at the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences' Tropical Research and Education Center (TREC) are looking for ways to improve production of crops such as squash and watermelon. Geoffrey Meru, assistant professor in the Horticultural Sciences Department at TREC, is one of the researchers examining key challenges limiting growers’ success and addressing…