Controlling Purple Nutsedge in Tomatoes

Abbey Taylor Research, Tomatoes, Top Posts, VSCNews magazine

Purple nutsedge can be a tough nut to crack for many tomato growers. Nathan Boyd, weed scientist at the University of Florida’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC), recently completed herbicide trials examining whether pre-emergent or post-emergent herbicides work better in controlling purple nutsedge in tomatoes. The trials took place at the GCREC in Wimauma. Purple nutsedge can be …

Herbicide Recommendations for Pepper Production

Abbey Taylor Research, Top Posts, VSCNews magazine

By Nathan Boyd Weed management can be a significant issue for many farms that grow peppers using a plasticulture production system. Nutsedge species can penetrate plastic mulches, and broadleaf weeds and grasses can emerge in the planting holes or in the rows between the raised, mulch-covered beds. Fumigants are an important component of weed management. However, except for metam products, …

UF/IFAS Hosts First Muscadine Grape Field Day in Citra

Karla Arboleda Grapes, Research, Top Posts

By Karla Arboleda On July 16, growers visited the University of Florida’s (UF) Plant Science Research and Education Unit to hear about the future of the muscadine grape industry in Florida. About 130 attendees listened to presentations on cultural practices, potential health benefits and production methods for muscadine grapes. The native Florida crop has been gaining more popularity among growers …

soil

Beneath the Earth, the ‘Black Box’ of Soil Holds a Key to Crop Growth

Dan Cooper Florida, Industry News Release, Research, Soil, Vegetables

IMMOKALEE, Fla. (UF/IFAS) — Like much of what lies just beneath the earth’s surface, soil microbes present a mystery. University of Florida scientist Sarah Strauss seeks to help untangle the web of intrigue surrounding soil microbes to improve agricultural production in Florida and globally. “There are microbial activities going on that we don’t exactly understand. It’s known as the ‘black …

Encouraging Plant Breeding Innovation

Abbey Taylor Research, Technology, Top Posts

Plant breeding tends to be a point of contention between the industry and urbanites. However, Andy LaVigne, president and CEO of the American Seed Trade Association, believes all crops begin at plant breeding. “We look at plant breeding as the base of agriculture,” says LaVigne. LaVigne believes innovation in plant breeding has helped the industry understand why a plant does …

Managing Southern Blight in the Southeast

Abbey Taylor Research, Top Posts, VSCNews magazine

By Gary Vallad Southern blight is a severe disease of vegetables that favors warm and wet weather common to production in the Southeast. The disease is caused by the soilborne fungus Athelia rolfsii (synonymous with Sclerotium rolfsii), which has a broad host range of over 1,200 plants. Since the phaseout of methyl bromide, outbreaks of southern blight have increased on …

How to Deal with Blueberries in Summer

Karla Arboleda Berries, Pests, Research, Top Posts

By Karla Arboleda Summer weather is in full swing in affecting Florida crops, and blueberries are no exception. During the summer, algal stem blotch can dominate blueberry fields if not handled quickly and properly. Doug Phillips, blueberry Extension coordinator for the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, explains the important steps to take. “In the summer when …

Studying K-Pam Efficacy for Post-Harvest Protection

Abbey Taylor Research, Strawberry, Top Posts

After harvest, field work remains. Fungi, weeds and leftover crop are sitting in the soil and need to be cleared out to prepare for the next season. Nathan Boyd, associate professor of weed science, recently studied the efficacy of K-Pam soil fumigant on crop destruction and weed management after harvest. According to Boyd, K-Pam was injected through drip tape following …