tomato diseases

Drones Detect Two Tomato Diseases With 99 Percent Accuracy

Dan Cooper Florida, Industry News Release, Research, Technology, Tomatoes, Top Posts

(UF/IFAS) — New technology being developed by University of Florida scientists identifies two dangerous tomato diseases with 99 percent accuracy. This finding is critical because diseases can cost growers millions of dollars annually in the state’s third most valuable crop. Thus, the earlier farmers detect those ailments, the better their chances of treating them before the diseases cause excessive damage. …

light bulb

Light Bulb Moments in the Improvement of Greenhouse Growing

Dan Cooper Georgia, Horticulture, Industry News Release, Research

By Aaron Hale (UGA/CAES) — The illuminated light bulb. It’s the symbol of a great idea come to life. Erico Mattos’ big idea doesn’t reinvent that iconic bulb exactly but reimagines how it can be used. Around the globe, greenhouses grow fruits and vegetables to provide a healthy food supply year-round. But as reliable as the sun is for providing light …

Managing Fusarium Wilt and Whiteflies in Watermelon

Ashley Robinson Research, Top Posts, Watermelon

By Ashley Robinson Fusarium wilt is one of the most serious and difficult diseases to manage in watermelons and occurs in most production regions worldwide. The fungal disease can be seedborne and has great longevity in the soil, allowing the infested soil to also serve as a source of infection. FUSARIUM WILT Fusarium wilt has been a recurring issue for …

Grafted Watermelon Seedlings Could Benefit Growers

Ashley Robinson Research, Top Posts, Watermelon

By Ashley Robinson Researchers at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are studying grafted watermelon seedlings because of the advantages they can provide to growers. The grafted seedlings, an intentional fusion of plant parts, are resistant to fusarium wilt and tolerant to cold temperatures. “This is kind of an additional tool to use if you do …

Current Data Shows Glyphosate Is Not Linked to Cancer

Ashley Robinson Florida Ag Expo, Research, Top Posts

By Ashley Robinson The world’s most widely used weed killer has been under review by researchers and agencies after being accused of causing cancer. Public concerns have been on the rise since 2015 when the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reclassified glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, as a probable carcinogen. Roundup, the world’s most commonly used herbicide, …

vanilla

Scientists Developing Recipe for Growing Vanilla in South Florida

Dan Cooper Florida, Industry News Release, Research

(UF/IFAS) — A tablespoon of vanilla goes a long way. As a key spice in baking, the intoxicating aromatic bean that reminds folks of delicious holiday desserts has a variety of uses throughout the year. As a bean, it is used to flavor foods and products from cakes to candles. As an extract, it is a basic ingredient in flavoring …

blueberry

UF Scientists Join Multistate Blueberry Breeding Grant

Dan Cooper Berries, Florida, Industry News Release, Research

(UF/IFAS) — A plant breeder and a food scientist, both with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), will join a $12.8 million, multistate research grant to broaden the nation’s blueberry breeding capabilities. For the project, Patricio Muñoz, a UF/IFAS assistant professor of horticultural sciences and Charlie Sims, a UF/IFAS professor of food science and human …

USDA Funds Multistate Efforts to Battle Pepper Diseases

Karla Arboleda North Carolina, Research, Top Posts

By Karla Arboleda The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded a team of faculty from institutions across the country to study emerging pepper diseases. The University of Florida leads the project titled “Management of Endemic and Emerging Bacterial Diseases of Capsicum by Plant Resistance.” USDA also provided funding to North Carolina State University (NC …