An Update on Diamondback Moths

Abbey Taylor Pests, Research, Top Posts

Gary England, a regional specialized Extension agent and director of the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Hastings Agricultural Extension Center, and UF/IFAS Assistant Professor Hugh Smith are starting a second research trial on diamondback moths. In previous seasons, the diamondback moth has been a concern for cabbage, collard greens and Asian vegetables. The main purpose for …

Distract Pests from Attacking Crops

Abbey Taylor Pests, Top Posts

Ayanava Majumdar, a vegetable entomologist at Auburn University, recently spoke at the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference on the benefits of trap crops to fend off pests. Trap crops are decoy crops that distract pests before they can attack production crops. The trap crop can be the same species as the main crop, or it could be completely different. …

An Organic Approach to Better Bug Control

Kelsey Fry Fruit, Pests, Top Posts

Reese Haley, the owner of Morning Bell Farms, has implemented an organic approach to better control bugs from invading his blueberry crops. The strategy involves making a wine from culled blueberries and sugar that sits in a container for seven to 14 days. When the wine is ready, Haley says it should be like gel. The wine is then poured …

Utilization of Biopesticides by Growers

Abbey Taylor Pests, Top Posts

Growers having pest problems at their operations may be interested in the utilization of non-traditional pesticides and biocontrol methods. Joe Noling, Extension specialist at the University of Florida, spoke with AgNet Media at the recent Florida Ag Expo about grower use of biocontrol methods. “Repeated use of anything is going to select towards an organism that can tolerate more and …

Whitefly Infestation Only in Palm Beach County – For Now

Kelsey Fry Pests, Vegetables Leave a Comment

From the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: GAINESVILLE, Fla. — People in Palm Beach County can help manage a potential outbreak of the Q-biotype whitefly through early detection and identification of the insect, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. This significant tropical and subtropical pest may threaten Florida crops such …